Is this I9 hub failing?

shrpshtr325

Infinite Source of Sarcasm
Team MTBNJ Halter's
When I went with new wheel build I went with the 36T because I read up on both. They said you want less engagement on a MTB for reliability. on a road bike go with the
56T. It made sense to me and I have about 3500 miles on the hubs.

that recommendation seems backwards to me, on a road bike you are constantly pedaling so wtf cares how long it takes to engage, your not letting it disengage all that frequently, on a mtb the increased engagement allows for better control ratcheting over obstacles.
 

Steve Vai

Endurance Guy: Tolerates most of us.
that recommendation seems backwards to me, on a road bike you are constantly pedaling so wtf cares how long it takes to engage, your not letting it disengage all that frequently, on a mtb the increased engagement allows for better control ratcheting over obstacles.

This. I run the 16 for road because it's quiet and makes zero difference.
 

Santapez

Well-Known Member
Team MTBNJ Halter's
My ECHO 109 freewheel is like 15 years old and is still awesome. Wonder how no one has translated that tech into a Freehub System yet?
Isn't it basically because it's huge compared to a modern hub/freewheel arrangement?

I had both an Echo and a Monty, very reliable, but not lightweight. Maybe lighter than an Onyx hub though...

I never felt the need on a mountain bike that I wanted more engagement when running those. In fact when I had the chain too tight I'd find times where I'd slightly pause and then my feet weren't in the best position and it was a ton of torque to move the crank.
 

Steve Vai

Endurance Guy: Tolerates most of us.
Isn't it basically because it's huge compared to a modern hub/freewheel arrangement?

I had both an Echo and a Monty, very reliable, but not lightweight. Maybe lighter than an Onyx hub though...

I never felt the need on a mountain bike that I wanted more engagement when running those. In fact when I had the chain too tight I'd find times where I'd slightly pause and then my feet weren't in the best position and it was a ton of torque to move the crank.

It’s smaller than an I9 ring drive. I run a 16t FF setup.

IMG_0350.jpeg
 

one piece crank

Well-Known Member
I'll lend you my Morrow that has something like 60 degrees before engagement...and you have to 'chase' it when it's rolling.
I ride Suntour and Bendix coaster brakes every week. The Bendix is tight at 20 degrees.

I had both an Echo and a Monty, very reliable, but not lightweight. Maybe lighter than an Onyx hub though...
I’m a big guy and everything Monty folded beneath me. Except the 19” rear rim.

It’s smaller than an I9 ring drive. I run a 16t FF setup.
Never owned a FF setup. BITD I rode Suntour BMX FW’s. Later I switched to White Trials.
 
Last edited:

John the Plumber

Active Member
that recommendation seems backwards to me, on a road bike you are constantly pedaling so wtf cares how long it takes to engage, your not letting it disengage all that frequently, on a mtb the increased engagement allows for better control ratcheting over obstacles.
When your in a pace line you are pedaling at a slower cadence or drafting and not pedaling when all of a sudden the pace line accelerates you need the increased engagement is needed. I could be wrong but it seems to work. On the MTB I put the lower engagement for reliability..... At 66 I am not to fast......
 

Teutonic

New Member
I see some mentions of the DT240EXP having failures too, but most of what I've read elsewhere is that that was an early out of spec batch (~2020-2021). Are the DT350 and DT240EXP now considered reliable? Is going to the 54T not recommended for either? I've had a few friends have i9 failures so I was leaning towards the DTs.
 
Top Bottom